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Fig. 5 | Journal of Translational Medicine

Fig. 5

From: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not impair responses to resistance training

Fig. 5

Comparison of the effects of the resistance training intervention on whole-body endurance performance in COPD and Healthy, presented as relative changes from baseline (per study cluster; A) and as relative and numeric differences in change scores between study clusters (B and C, respectively). Endurance measures included maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max, cl. min−1; COPD, n = 15; Healthy, n = 54) and maximal workload (watts; COPD, n = 18; Healthy, n = 55) achieved during two-legged cycling, cycling economy (cl. min−1; COPD, n = 15; Healthy, n = 54) and gross efficiency measured during submaximal one-legged cycling, the number of steps achieved during 6-min step test (COPD, n = 18; Healthy, n = 57) and the number of sit-to-stands achieved during a 1-min sit-to-stand test (COPD, n = 19; Healthy, n = 56). COPD showed greater relative improvements in cycling economy and gross efficiency. For these outcome measures, COPD, but not Healthy, displayed benefits of high-load training (10RM) compared to low-load training (30RM) (D and E). Healthy showed greater numeric improvement in the number of steps achieved during the 6-min step test. COPD and Healthy showed similar relative and numeric training-associated changes in the whole-body endurance performance factor. #statistically different response to resistance training between study clusters. statistically different response to 10RM and 30RM resistance training in study cluster. Data are presented as means with 95% confidence limits

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